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Species Account


NMW.Z.2009.018; Female; 'Wales, Glam vc41. Whitford Burrows ss-436941'; Coll.: P. M. Pavett; Date: 1.viii.2001
i14915

NMW.Z.2009.018; Female; 'Wales, Glam vc41. Whitford Burrows ss-436941'; Coll.: P. M. Pavett; Date: 1.viii.2001
i14916

NMW.33758; Male; 'Penarth'; Coll.: H. M. Hallett; Date: 1915
i14917

NMW.Z.2009.018; Female; 'Wales, Glam vc41. Whitford Burrows ss-436941'; Coll.: P. M. Pavett; Date: 1.viii.2001
NMW Image No. i14915

Macropsis fuscula (Zetterstedt)

Membracoidea : Cicadellidae
Diseases Transmitted

Distribution Map
(simplified continental distribution)
Geographical Distribution:

Recorded Distribution(s):
This species occurs in Europe and British Co¬lumbia, Canada. It is common in the Netherlands (Fluiter and van der Meer 1958 [265]) and England (Cadman 1961 120). Wagner in 1964 (844) reported it from southern Sweden, northern Finland, Spain, Italy, Bulgaria, Ukraine, northern Iraq, Turkistan, and Siberia. In 1954, Beirne (56) determined Specimens collected from Victoria, Lulu Island, British Columbia, which represented the first probable introduction to the North American Continent. (Nielson, 1968)

Macropsis fuscula (Zetterstedt)
Diseases Transmitted Pathogen Type
Crops Affected by Macropsis fuscula (Zetterstedt)
Rice Citrus Carrot
Barley Apple Tomato
Maize (Corn) Pear Potato
Sugarcane Elm Strawberry
Wheat Palms Rubus
Sorghum Grapevine Papaya
Other (grasses/cereals) Ornamentals Peach

This species is a vector of rubus stunt virus of several wild and cultivated species of Rubus in the Netherlands and England. Fluiter and van der Meer (264) were first to report transmission of this virus by fuscula in 1953, and this represented one of the first evidences of a leafhopper-borne virus in Europe. Transmission was obtained in field tests where healthy plants were exposed in a virus-infected raspberry planting infested with leafhoppers. Percent transmission varied from 3 to 50. In later tests leafhoppers reared on virus-infected raspberry plants were transferred to healthy plants and allowed to feed from 1 to 21 days. Transmission was effected to 19 out of 105 plants tested. The latent and retention periods were long, but the exact number of days was not determined. Transmission occurred in raspberry fields in July, August, and September when leafhopper populations were greatest.
(Nielson 1968)

This species is the most important vector in the natural spread of rubus stunt virus in England and the Netherlands.
(Nielson 1968)

Identification Plates
Macropsis fuscula


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Plate 1
Species Description

Length:
Small, robust species. Length of male 4.20—4.50 mm., female 4.50—5.00 mm.

Colour:
General color bight brown to dark brown. Crown tan with two black spots on anterior margin; pronotum tan with black irregular markings near anterior margin; elytra light brown to dark brown, veins nearly black; color deeper in males.

Genitalia:
Pygofer in lateral aspect about as long as wide; curved spine arising from caudoventral margin, spine very long, narrow, extending beyond dorsal margin of pygofer and projecting dorsocephalad; aedeagus in lateral aspect, simple, broad basally, attenuated apically, tubelike, curved laterally, gonopore subapical; Style in dorsal aspect long and slender, apical two-thirds tubelike, apex curved laterally; female seventh sternum in ventral aspect with caudal margin broadly convex (fig. 15).

Species Diagnosis

This species is so similar to scotti that it is difficult to separate on the basis of the genitalia and other characters. In 1964, Wagner (844) separated fuscula from scotti by the shape of the lorum, which is short and broad in the former species. Color variations were evident but not recommended for separating the species. I have followed Wagner (843, 844) after he carefully studied several species in which he concluded that nassatus, nitidula, and rubi were conspecific with fuscula in 1950 and 1964. Beirne in 1954 (56) synonymized tibialis on the basis that it was a color form of fuscula, but Wagner in 1964 (844) synonymized it under scutellata.
(Nielson 1968)

Ecology

Host Plant Activity Period (Months) Dormancy Generations
- -
Eggs -
Nymphs -
Adult -
One per year -
Continuous -
Variable -
Macropsis fuscula (Zetterstedt)

Higher taxonomy

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Superfamily Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Hemiptera
Suborder: Auchenorrhyncha
Infraorder: Cicadamorpha
Membracoidea Cicadellidae
Subfamily: Macropsinae
Macropsis fuscula (Zetterstedt)
References
Nielson, M. W. 1968b. The leafhopper vectors of phytopathogenic viruses (Homoptera, Cicadellidae). Taxonomy, biology and virus transmission. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin . 1382 386 pp.
Record last updated - 25/09/2019