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Species Account


USNM; Male; 'Woodland NJ'; On Cranberry; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-18-1916
i14148

USNM; Male; 'Woodland NJ'; On Cranberry; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-18-1916
i14149

USNM; Male; 'Pemberton NJ'; ex Chamaedaphne; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-30-1946
i14150

USNM; Female; 'Pemberton NJ'; ex Chamaedaphne; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-30-1946
i14151

USNM; Male; 'Woodland NJ'; ex Cranberry; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-18-1916
i14152

USNM; Male; 'Woodland NJ'; On Cranberry; Coll.: W E tomlinson; Date: vi-18-1916
NMW Image No. i14148

Scleroracus vaccinii (van Duzee 1890h: 135 )

Membracoidea : Cicadellidae
Diseases Transmitted

Distribution Map
(simplified continental distribution)
Geographical Distribution:
North America

Recorded Distribution(s):
This species is most abundant in the Northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. Medler (1958) examined - specimens from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and the Canadian Provinces of Nova Scotia, Ontario, and Quebec. (Nielson,1968)

Scleroracus vaccinii (van Duzee 1890h: 135 )
Diseases Transmitted Pathogen Type
Crops Affected by Scleroracus vaccinii (van Duzee 1890h: 135 )
Rice Citrus Carrot
Barley Apple Tomato
Maize (Corn) Pear Potato
Sugarcane Elm Strawberry
Wheat Palms Rubus
Sorghum Grapevine Papaya
Other (grasses/cereals) Ornamentals Peach

This species is a vector of false blossom virus of cranberry in the Eastern United States. It was first reported as a suspect vector of this virus by Dobroscky in 1928 (212) under the name of “Euscelis striatulus Fallen.” Later in 1929 and 1931 Dobroscky (213, 214) confirmed transmission of the virus after feeding leafhoppers on diseased plants for certain periods of time, and then he transferred infective’ insects to healthy cranberry plants, where they fed for 2 weeks. Experimental work carried out for a period of 4 years gave positive results of transmission. In one experiment the incubation period was determined as 21 days in the vector. Experiments on natural transmission proved negative.
(Nielson 1968)

This species is an important vector of this virus in the Eastern United States.


(Nielson 1968)

Identification Plates
Scleroracus vaccinii


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Plate 1
Species Description

Length:
Small, slightly robust species. male 3.50—3.70 mm., female 4.00—4.50 mm.

Colour:
General color light brown to dark brown. Crown light brown with dark transverse lines; pronotum light brown with black markings; elytra brown to almost black, veins light brown; male more deeply marked than females.
.

Genitalia:
Pygofer in lateral aspect about twice as long as wide, caudal margin with small lobe on caudoventral margin; aedeagus in lateral aspect broad basally, narrowed at apical half, curved laterally, shaft with lateral hooked subapical processes in ventral aspect; gonopore apical; style in dorsal aspect with short, narrow apices; female seventh sternum in ventral aspect with caudal margin excavated on each side of middle.

Species Diagnosis





Ecology

Host Plant Activity Period (Months) Dormancy Generations
- -
Eggs -
Nymphs -
Adult -
One per year -
Continuous -
Variable -
Scleroracus vaccinii (van Duzee 1890h: 135 )

Higher taxonomy

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Superfamily Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Hemiptera
Suborder: Auchenorrhyncha
Infraorder: Cicadamorpha
Membracoidea Cicadellidae
Subfamily: Deltocephalinae
Scleroracus vaccinii (van Duzee 1890h: 135 )
References
Nielson, M. W. 1968b. The leafhopper vectors of phytopathogenic viruses (Homoptera, Cicadellidae). Taxonomy, biology and virus transmission. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin . 1382 386 pp.
Record last updated - 25/09/2019