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Species Account


NMW.Z.2009.014; Male; 'UK: England Herefordshire VC 36 Moccas Park SO 341425'; Coll.: R. Muhlethaler; Date: 23.vii.2008
i14883

NMW.Z.2009.014; Male; 'UK: England Herefordshire VC 36 Moccas Park SO 341425'; Coll.: R. Muhlethaler; Date: 23.vii.2008
i14884

NMW.Z.2009.014; Male; 'UK: England Herefordshire VC 36 Moccas Park SO 341425'; Coll.: R. Muhlethaler; Date: 23.vii.2008
NMW Image No. i14883

Macrosteles viridigriseus (Edwards 1924a: 54 )

Membracoidea : Cicadellidae
Diseases Transmitted

Distribution Map
(simplified continental distribution)
Geographical Distribution:
Europe

Recorded Distribution(s):
This species is common in Europe. Ribaut (1952) reported it from England, Gascony, Languedoc, Sweden, Finland, Poland, Switzerland, Norway, Germany, Burgundy, Alsace, Czechoslovakia, and northern Italy. (Nielson,1968)

Macrosteles viridigriseus (Edwards 1924a: 54 )
Diseases Transmitted Pathogen Type
Crops Affected by Macrosteles viridigriseus (Edwards 1924a: 54 )
Rice Citrus Carrot
Barley Apple Tomato
Maize (Corn) Pear Potato
Sugarcane Elm Strawberry
Wheat Palms Rubus
Sorghum Grapevine Papaya
Other (grasses/cereals) Ornamentals Peach

This species is a vector of clover phyllody and witches’ broom viruses in England. Frazier and Posnette (276) first reported this species as a vector of green petal (clover phyllody) virus of strawberry in 1956. Then in 1957 (277) confirmed transmission of this virus and showed that the species was also capable of transmitting witches’ broom virus. These investigations were the first on record of the leafhopper-borne virus in England. Transmission of the clover phyllody virus was effected after feeding the insects on diseased plantain and clover plants for 3 weeks and transferring them to healthy test plants. Only one definite transmission to mayweed was obtained. Symptoms that developed on plantain test plants were so mild that it was uncertain whether transmission occurred. No transmissions were obtained on strawberry, but the virus relationship was proved by dodder transmission.
In confirmation studies of 1957 Frazier and Posnette
(277) found that adults transmitted phyllody virus only when reared on infected plants. In tests with witches’ broom virus, transmission was effected only when infected insects were collected from the field. The vector was rather inefficient owing to its inability to survive on clover plants and the long latent period of the virus in the insect. Only six transmissions of these viruses were obtained from over 400 test insects.

(Nielson 1968)

This species is not considered an important vector of clover phyllody and witches’ broom viruses owing to high adult mortality on clover plants and its relative inefficiency in transmitting the viruses.
(Nielson 1968)

Identification Plates
Macrosteles viridigriseus


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Plate 1
Species Description

Length:
Overall length: Male 2.8-3.4 mm, female 3.5-3.9 mm.

Abdomen:
Male abdomen: 2nd acrotergite with trunk widely V-shaped, broad triangularly produced ventrally, neck slightly shorter than half of trunk width. 2nd tergal apodeme reaching to 3/4 of tergite posteriorly. 1st sternal apodeme with posterior lobes
longer than wide, inclined in lateral aspect. 2nd sternal
apodeme with posterior lobes about twice as long as basal width.

Colour:
General colouration yellow to yellowish green. Vertex rather deep roundly produced in both sexes, with spot pattern often confluent partly, or sometimes isolated; median spots sometimes absent. Frontoclypeus with black. transverse bands confluent partly, or isolated. Anteclypeus often broader basally in both sexes. Scutellum with basal spots often disappeared.

Genitalia:
Pygofer in lateral aspect slightly longer than wide, caudal margin narrowly convex, ventral margin with small lobe; aedeagus in lateral aspect tubelike, narrow, shaft Straight with pair of terminal processes that curve laterad at basal half and caudad at apical half, lateral margins serrate at basal half, terminal processes inverted U-shape in ventral aspect; gonopore terminal; style in dorsal aspect simple, apex foot shaped; female seventh sternum in ventral aspect with caudal margin slightly concave at middle (fig.55).

Species Diagnosis

From laevis, to which it is similar in general habitus, viridigriseus can be separated by the basal half of the aedeagus with serrate lateral margins in ventral aspect and the apex of the style, which is foot shaped.

(Nielson 1968)

Ecology

Host Plant Activity Period (Months) Dormancy Generations
- -
Eggs -
Nymphs -
Adult -
One per year -
Continuous -
Variable -
Macrosteles viridigriseus (Edwards 1924a: 54 )

Higher taxonomy

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Superfamily Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Hemiptera
Suborder: Auchenorrhyncha
Infraorder: Cicadamorpha
Membracoidea Cicadellidae
Subfamily: Deltocephalinae
Macrosteles viridigriseus (Edwards 1924a: 54 )
References
Nielson, M. W. 1968b. The leafhopper vectors of phytopathogenic viruses (Homoptera, Cicadellidae). Taxonomy, biology and virus transmission. United States Department of Agriculture Technical Bulletin . 1382 386 pp.
Record last updated - 25/09/2019